SHDP Day 2. Oct 27th

So today’s journey into the abstract began with a memory of a vehicle in passing. The Ford Everest. A version of Mazda’s B-series pickup. Sold to the middle eastern and Asian markets.

Ford Everest. Just another version of the Mazda B-series pickups.
Ford Everest. Just another version of the Mazda B-series pickups.

This then reminded me of a vehicle I’d seen in passing long ago. Another version and probably the successor to the Everest. The Mazda Proceed. It’s neat to see SUV versions of pickups I’d never associated with such an idea. It’s funny, here in North America people would put caps/canopies on the back of pickups, seal them to the cab and cut the back of the cab out to make their own SUV’s. Much like the Toyota Trekker I mentioned in an article documenting abstract Toyota pickups, found here.

Mazda Proceed, this is the Marvie, a top of the line version of the SUV'd Mazda B-series pickup.
Mazda Proceed, this is the Marvie, a top of the line version of the SUV’d Mazda B-series pickup.

 

This reminds me, there is one vehicle I’ve learned about since that previous Toyota article. I was bopping around the internet like usual and ran into a photo of an Indonesian Toyota Mighty-X Station Wagon / Van.

Yup, that's a Toyota Mighty-X Van. That's not a canopy, but a full factory SUV.
Yup, that’s a Toyota Mighty-X Van. That’s not a canopy, but a full factory SUV.

 

While we’re riding this train of B-series badge fudging and oddly named Mazda’s we might as well touch in on, some more ford versions.

Here is the ford Raider, an Australian version of the Mazda Proceed.
Here is the ford Raider, an Australian version of the Mazda Proceed.
The American Ford Courier was another interesting port of the Mazda B-series chassis. Specifically styled to convert the look of the little Mazda to match that of the F series ford trucks of the era. I see a lot of Japanese vintage car shows draw inspiration from this little factory flop with entire body conversions of popular vintage vehicles for their Kei-vehicles!
The American Ford Courier was another interesting port of the Mazda B-series chassis. Specifically styled to convert the look of the little Mazda to match that of the F series ford trucks of the era. I see a lot of Japanese vintage car shows draw inspiration from this little factory flop with entire body conversions of popular vintage vehicles for their Kei-vehicles!
Chevy C-10 Look-a-like on a Nissan Cube Chassis.
Chevy C-10 Look-a-like on a Nissan Cube Chassis.
Dodge B100-esque Kei-conversion. Looks to be a Daihatsu Hi-jet base, but I'm probably wrong.
Dodge B100-esque Kei-conversion. Looks to be a Daihatsu Hi-jet base, but I’m probably wrong.

 

Another abstract badge abuse came in the form of the Mazda Navajo. A mildly insensitively named version of the Ford Explorer. This was the least of your desires. An American manufactured vehicle badged as a Japanese vehicle. I could only think that this would hurt Mazda’s image, than help it. ┬álol What’s neat is they were only sold as the 2-door version of the Explorer chassis, which in Explorer form was rare on it’s own.

Mazda Navajo. Why!?
Mazda Navajo. Why!?

 

I just had to include this van for the name bullshit Mazda was pulling in that era. The Mazda Bongo Friendee. Weeee! lol
I just had to include this van for the name bullshit Mazda was pulling in that era. The Mazda Bongo Friendee. Weeee! lol

 

Not everything on my Journey is inspiring and magical. Oldsmobile Bravada. Who asked for this?
Not everything on my Journey is inspiring and magical. Oldsmobile Bravada. Who asked for this?

 

Let me help you wash your eyes. A very Early, and absolutely beautiful example of good design. The Mazda Proceed pickup.
Let me help you wash your eyes. A very Early, and absolutely beautiful example of good design. The Mazda Proceed pickup.
Capping off today's Journey, a gorgeous Daihatsu Hi-jet.
Capping off today’s Journey, a gorgeous Daihatsu Hi-jet.

Edit: Update, today’s drawing


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